Breast Cancer Topic: Comedo necrosis vs. necrosis - comedone necrosis breast

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comedone necrosis breast - Comedo type ductal carcinoma in situ | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org


Jul 19, 2015 · Comedo (kuh-ME-do) - A subtype of DCIS indicating a high grade of disease, which translates to higher risk for development of invasive breast cancer. Comedo looks and acts differently from other in situ subtypes. The center of the duct is plugged with dead cellular debris, known as "necrosis". This is a sign of rapid and aggressive growth. The breast cancer is no longer a DCIS but an invasive ductal carcinoma, the most common type of breast cancer. High-grade DCIS is sometimes described as "comedo" or "comedo necrosis." Comedo refers to areas of dead (necrotic) cancer cells, which build up inside the tumor. When cancer cells grow quickly, some cells don’t get enough.

A comedo-type ductal carcinoma in situ, also known as comedocarcinoma in situ is the high grade subtype of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).. It completely fills and dilates the ducts and lobules in TDLU with plugs of high grade tumor cells with central necrosis "comedonecrosis". The term, comedo, describes the appearance of the cancer. When comedo type breast tumors are cut, the dead cells inside of them (necrosis) can be expressed out just like a comedo or blackhead on the skin. The most common non-comedo types of DCIS are: Solid DCIS: cancer cells completely fill the affected breast ducts.

There are two categories of DCIS: non-comedo and comedo. The term, comedo, describes the appearance of the cancer. When comedo type breast tumors are cut, the dead cells inside of them (necrosis) can be expressed out just like a comedo or blackhead on the skin. The most common non-comedo types of DCIS are. Comedocarcinoma is one kind of breast cancer which is most commonly very early-stage which demonstrates central necrosis. It is usually a type of ductal carcinoma in situ.Comedo carcinomas are usually non-infiltrating and intraductal tumors. However, there have been accounts of comedocarcinoma which has then diversified into other cell types and developed into infiltrating (invasive) ductal Specialty: Oncology.